Nathalie Forest
Branch Manager

Nathalie Forest has been in charge and manages the operations of the Quebec branch since her arrival in 2005. Mrs. Forest has also been responsible for the business development of the branch's major accounts since its inception.

With more than 18 years of experience in recruiting and managing the workforce, including more than 14 years in the information technology (IT) sector, she assures the growth of the branch through professional staffing and contingent workforce in the Quebec City area.

She manages and guides its sales and recruitment teams by advocating a human approach, results oriented and footprint of the highest quality standards. This approach has allowed the Quebec City branch to carve out a place of choice among the region's largest clients and has earned an excellent reputation.

Born in Quebec City, Ms. Forest holds a Bachelor of Law degree from l’Université Laval. Achieving the highest peaks in women's tennis rankings to a junior international level has led her to travel all over the world. As a mother of two children, she is sensitive to charitable organizations in the region and makes a point of contributing to it and investing in it when the opportunity arises.

Nathalie Forest

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What is Contractor Tenure?

Leveraging a contingent workforce in today’s business landscape is a risky but rewarding strategy. With the velocity of emerging technologies, skills gaps in the workforce, shifts in employment attitudes and increasing customer expectations, employers need to be able to engage talent quickly and flexibly to remain competitive.

Contingent Workforce Management

The real reasons candidates reject job offers - Should you revisit your talent acquisition strategy?

It’s a tight labour market, and both Canadian and U.S. organizations are grappling with the challenges presented by a candidate controlled workforce.  When there was once very little perceived pressure for employers to accommodate candidates during the hiring process, the tables have turned, and an intentional focus by employers on engaging talent with a candidate-driven approach is now essential to acquiring skilled contingent workers.

Why?

Because they can afford to be choosy, and employers can’t afford to remain stagnant in their hiring strategies if they want to remain competitive. Yet, only 7 per cent of organizations are doing it right: attracting qualified talent, quickly filling open positions (in under 10 days) and optimizing costs. However, a solid talent acquisition strategy will help employers pinpoint problem areas in their hiring programs and tap into why their choice candidates could be turning them down. And if you don’t have a talent acquisition strategy, now is the time to start—because the war for talent is getting harder to win.

The following considerations are areas we recommend employers evaluate in order keep candidates from rejecting offers.


Candidate experience
Candidates expect a unique experience, forcing organizations to work harder to attract and retain their attention. This means employers need to demonstrate their eagerness to hire and avoid poor hiring habits. 

The following is a list of mistakes employers could be making that are turning off candidates: 
• Communication lacks a personal touch and isn't tailored to a candidate's unique needs.
• The hiring process was too long and/or required too many interviews.
• The job description didn't accurately portray the role once the candidate reached the interview stage.
• There's a lack of communication between your organization and your staffing partner. 
• The hieing manager didn't effectively "sell the role or organization."

Tools like Inavero. These tools measure the NPS score a candidate gives at each stage of engagement (a satisfaction ranking of 1-10), easily allowing client service teams to take control in identifying areas in which the agency is exceeding candidate expectations and areas where it can do better, allowing for continuous improvement to the recruitment process and the client’s employers brand. 


Negative employer branding
Negative employer branding makes it all the more difficult for organizations to engage talented workers, with 55 per cent of job seekers abandoning an application after reading a negative company review online. Yet, there are ways to improve your employer branding.

Glassdoor is a review website where previous and current workers can leave feedback on their employer, and it’s important for organizations to appoint a monitor to oversee their reviews ( yet only 45 per cent of organizations are doing so). The appointed monitor should also provide insights into how the organization will address the concern(s). If you've successfully taken the steps to resolve issues, data about trends in your improved reviews will be visible. 


Ghosting
Communication with candidates at each stage of the hiring phase is key to keeping qualified talent engaged, yet some organizations are still going radio silent on candidates when they find others more qualified for the role. And it’s a mistake. As nearly a quarter of job seekers ( 23 per cent) will ghost a company who previously stopped communicating with them. And more than one-third (35 per cent) of job seekers find it very iresponsible for employers to go ghost.

• It’s imperative for hiring teams, recruiters and client service teams to actively return emails and phone calls within 24 hours or risk losing that resource to a timelier organization.
• Hiring teams need to follow up each communication with the next steps in the hiring process and what the expected timeline will be like.
• Nearly 40 per cent  of job seekers (36 per cent) receive no response at all when a company rejects them. To expect engagement in the future, organizations and staffing agencies must have transparent communication with their candidates—even if it’s an awkward or uncomfortable conversation.


Competitive compensation
When it comes to making an offer, it's critical to get an understanding of what’s important to your candidate by asking yourself, “What do they hope to gain out of the role, and where is the balance between what they’re looking for and the expected rate?”

• Ensure your rate card is up to date to reflect current market
• Consider non-monetary drivers unique to their requirements like remote work options, a flexible work schedule, exciting project work, career growth or the use of new technologies.
• Non-monetary drivers must include incentives relevant to what matters most to that candidate, because what is an attractive incentive to a Gen X worker won’t be as attractive to a Gen Z candidate.


Diversity and Inclusion (D&I)
Sixty seven per cent of job seekers say that a company's level of diversity affects their decision to work there. For organizations that do have a D&I program, only 17 per cent consider Diversity and Inclusion as a key part of their EVP. And it’s a major mistake. Because younger workers are entering the workforce, and they're the most diverse generation employed -- with 77 per cent of Gen Zs stating that an organizations level of diversity affects their decision to work there. 

Who are these diverse workers candidates want to see?
• Gender
• Ethnicity/race
• Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT)
• Military veterans
• Different ages
• Workers with disabilities
• Varying thinking styles

Organizations with inclusive cultures are twice as likely to meet or exceed financial targets, 3x more likely to be high-performing, 6x more likely to be innovative and agile and 8x more likely to achieve better business outcomes. 

Identifying and understanding gaps in your current recruitment program is critical to designing a talent acquisition strategy that will effectively source, screen, onboard and redeploy contingent workers.

Talent Acquisition

Guide to designing a high impact talent acquisition strategy

For over two decades, the ‘war for talent’ is still making headlines—ever since Steve Hankin coined the term in 1997 and McKinsey wrote the book by the same name. Yet, more than 20 years later, the fight for skilled contingent workers wages as competitive as ever. 

Because it’s getting harder to win. 

With current low employment rates, supply is down and demand is up, driving both enterprise-level organizations and small businesses to compete for workers qualified to fill skill gaps created by emerging technologies, shifts in employment attitudes, lower project costs and educational gaps. And hiring strategies that worked years ago aren’t as effective in today’s gig economy.

Deloitte reports organizations that can effectively recruit and retain talent see 18 per cent higher revenues and 13 per cent higher profitibility over those that aren't as adept. And when contingent workers are expected to make up 43 per cent -- or almost half-- of the U.S. workforce by 2020, it’s more important now than ever to have an effective strategy to engage these types of niche workers. A successful recruitment program recognizes that hiring is more than just filling positions.   Here’s how to design an effective high-impact talent acquisition strategy that finds the right fit for your contingent worker needs.


1. Job descriptions: Write job descriptions that attract the right candidates
Crafting compelling job descriptions is an organization's first step in marketing their company and position to a future hire. And with job boards like Indeed listing over 20 million jobs, yours needs to stand out to have a competitive advantage. Go beyond core qualifications: A great job description will list the must haves and nice to have skills, desired industry experience and level of education, but remember that candidates need compelling reasons to leave their current workplace or choose your job over another opportunity. Aside from what you’re looking for, what can your organization offer? Describe benefits and perks that come with the position, like skills that will be learned on the job, new technologies that will be used, growth opportunities, location and flexible work or remote work options. 

Use traditional titles: Non-traditional job titles like "ninja," "rock star," and "bad ass" can not only confuse an ATS and significantly lessen your talent pool, they're also potentially discriminatory. Studies show that when listed in job descriptions, these words are major deterrents for women job seekers.

Talent Acquisition

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Customer Sucess Stories

“Excellent service, very timely response time, quality candidates and outstanding support.”

K.M.
Global Professional Services Firm

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National Telecommunications Provider

“..the most reliable partners we work with. They are timely with their submissions and are quick to respond to emails and provide updates and required information. Their candidates typically are at the top of the pack as is evident by their fill/success rate.“ 

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Leading Financial Services Institution

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